104. Sakhi The Entire World is Full of Pain

Guru Nanak, accompanied by Mardana, continued to travel southwards from Kanchi and reached the town Trivanmalai. The town these days falls within the district of South Arcot. In the 16th century, it was situated on the highway leading to South. On its western side were pathways passing through mountains. The word 'trivanmalai' means the sacred fire aflame on the mountain. As per ancient mythology, It is said that once Shiva's consort Parvati put her hands on Shiva's eyes, thus causing darkness in the entire world. At this, Shiva got annoyed with Parvati and sent her down to the world. Trivanmalai was one of the places where she did penance. For some time, she meditated here. Then Shiva sprouted fire on the adjoining hill, thus indicating that her lapse had been condoned. Thus, the town that came into being on the foot of the hill on which fire had sprouted came to be known as Trivanmalai. Guru Nanak stayed put in Trivanmalai for some time. Here stands a gurdwara in the memory of his visit. The gurdwara was managed by Mahant Narinder Nath until the 1960s. While putting up here, Guru Nanak thought that no god or goddess had been able to get free from the consequences of his or her karmas . Even Parvati had also to resort to penance. It is only through the Name Divine that one could escape from the effect of karma. It is believed that it was here that Guruji recited the following hymn:

Branded with a thousand marks of disgrace, Indra cried in shame. Paras Raam returned home crying. Ajai cried and wept, when he was made to eat the manure he had given, pretending it was charity. Such is the punishment received in the Court of the Lord. Rama wept when he was sent into exile, and separated from Sita and Lakhshman. The ten-headed Raawan, who stole away Sita with the beat of his tambourine, wept when he lost Sri Lanka. The Paandavas once lived in the Presence of the Lord; they were made slaves, and wept. Janmayjaa wept, that he had lost his way. One mistake, and he became a sinner. The Shaykhs, Pirs and spiritual teachers weep; at the very last instant, they suffer in agony. The kings weep - their ears are cut; they go begging from house to house. The miser weeps; he has to leave behind the wealth he has gathered. The Pandit, the religious scholar, weeps when his learning is gone. The young woman weeps because she has no husband. O Nanak, the whole world is suffering. He alone is victorious, who believes in the Lord's Name. No other action is of any account. ||1||  Shri Guru Granth Sahib ji, Ang. 953-54

The Guru stayed here for some time and then travelled on to the South.